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across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
schools there and i was -- when i was in the second grade, was in the inner city, one of the poorer neighborhoods in the city. so it was something i thought about since i was a little kid. and so when the case went to the supreme court, i was obviously very interested in following it because it was personal. >> host: talk about the personal connection. i always like to ask that before we get into the meat of it. when you were busing to the inner city, did you have a particularly stance on the question of desegregation and school integrace. >> guest: when you're a kid you don't thing about it. when i was reading at the reaction of the kids in the the '7s when they started buzzing -- busing, a lot of the kids were saying, i like this school, and as i got older i started to think about not only going to schooled and being surrounded by poverty i didn't see in my neighborhoods in the suburbs, but then the school is attended, there was tracking so you had the regular program, honors, and then we had advance programs, and those were cut very closely along race and class lines. so as a kid
at exorbitant rates -- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousness by getting this bill passed in the coming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the system, you elect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transforma
wrote it is i go out to the public schools when i was in second grade in the inner city in the housing projects in the poor neighborhoods in the city so it was something i had thought about actively since i was a little kid and so when it came into the supreme court i was interested in following that >> host: talking about the personal pieces i like to ask people their personal connection in the story when we get into the meat of it did you have a particularly stance on bus segregation? >> guest: i think they don't think about it and looking back to when i was looking at the reaction from the kids in the 70's when they started busting a lot of the kids would say i like it at this school. they didn't think about it but as i got older i started to think about not only going to schools and being surrounded by poverty that i didn't see in my neighborhood in the suburbs, but you know, at the same time in the schools that i had attended there was tracking so you have the regular program and in the advanced program they are close race on the class lines and so as a kid you absorb that and sta
off the coast. that's why we spared areas from new york city, d.c., philly, up there, even most of connecticut didn't see heavy snow. this was primarily just extreme eastern new england. this was a huge storm. this storm was a storm with some hurricanes, maybe stronger than some hurricanes. that's why it was windy through the northeast. still windy this morning. just gusted to 46 miles per hour. we're finally seeing the winds dying down around new york city, philly, hartford. gusty from providence northward. the winds will die down, but be thankful with the holiday kids aren't at the bus stop. windchills in the negative numbers through new england. minus five in august a. minus eight in albany. single digits from new york to philly to baltimore. you get the jist of it. not a pretty morning in new england. it was a miserable sunday. as far as the midwest goes, the next storm, this is an active pattern. we've got the next storm coming. there's another in the gulf of alaska that will be a more powerful storm swinging through the west into the middle of the country thursday. we'll s
. >> i think people are getting more sensitive to it as it happens in new york city. there's a big issue to their policies as they relate to stopping and frisking. stores don't want to be shoplifted with. but you have to make sure and identity and have some reasonable basis to do it, just not look at the color of someone's skin and say, you know what, i'm going to pat/frisk you. in the future, it makes it better, but it's more unfortunate that incidents like this go on. >> this is a major issue in new york city. there's a class action lawsuit pending in federal court. people in the african-american/hispanic community say that cops are abusing them repeatedly. this is a big issue. of course, now, the police were not involved in this incident, but it sheds light on it and i think it sheds light on how african-american citizens get -- >> i think we have to see a more forest whitaker movies. >> thanks for watching "newsroom." "newsroom international" is next. >> welcome, to "newsroom international. account account i'm suzanne malveaux. today i'm joined by michael holmes. >> nice to be here.
businesses for discrimination? more cities and states across the u.s. are saying yes, will it bring mayhem to the job market? and can facebook start doing my taxes? it is getting a $429 million tax refund. can the growing outrage finally sparked corporate tax reform in the u.s.? even when they say this not come it is always about "money." ♪ the cost of a gallon of regular unleaded gas surging 32 days straight. the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is $3.73 national average, up from $3.29 back on january 17. so how much more pain and drivers expect on the road ahead? let's ask senior petroleum analyst with everybody seems confused, it is not the summer driving season. reports are demand is down and supplies are up, so why are we paying these skyrocketing gasoline prices right now? >> looking at things, we have seen demand co-op from the data i have seen. a lot of it has to do with positive sentiment surrounding the economy, dow jones has one of the best january in years. if the dow has a great january, oil prices likely will follow. that is what we're seeing. ga
in the 30s in orlando even in miami that's a little bit chilly. 49 right now in the city of miami. otherwise temperatures will be rebounding as we head into the afternoon hours. it will be getting better. it's a very short lived blast of cold air across florida. we have concern about damage of crops a freeze warning is in effect through georgia florida panhandle and down into central portions of the state of florida. just very told today during the morning hours across the state of florida. where it is very cold is the northeast not because of actual temperatures but because it's so windy that makes it feel even colder. current windchill temperature only 6 degrees below zero across new england otherwise a brand new storm system across portions of the center of the country making blizzard conditions northern sections north dakota winter storm warning in northern minnesota. we are talking up to 10 inches or more of snow gusts up to 45 miles an hour. dangerous conditions on this monday in north central. >> we don't mind the cold we just hate all of the wind coupled together. >>> the white house
heating bills and sli shrinking paychecks. we have a reporter live at a gas station in new york city. what do the prices look like there? >> reporter: hi, john. yeah, gas prices are certainly skyrocketing. over here on 10th avenue, you'll see regular gas $4.15. i'm looking at the board now. premium is still $4.45. we're expected to see the numbers increase even further. let me shou the numbers. what it looks like in terms of the rest of the country. average price, $3.71. that's the average. but, you know, in some states, you know, it can get a lot higher than that. anyone in hawaii knows what i'm talking about. gas is $4.29 over there. the cheapest gas is in wyoming. $3.17 a gallon. this is really coming at a bad time for a lot of americans in this part of the country at least. people are spending more money on heating. they don't have the spare change to spare on gas prices getting higher. taxes also increasing for a lot of americans. at this particular gas station, i did speak to some taxi drivers who pulled in earlier this morning. i xad thasked them, what are yog to do? they told me th
-lost friend greg gutfeld. it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: so president obama is about to return to washington after a guys' weekend in florida where he played a round of golf with tiger woods. we'd love to show you pictures but there aren't available because the press was shut out. didn't the president say this last thursday? >> this is the most transparent administration in history. i can documentbe how that is the case. >> dana: the white house press corps is not convinced. fox's senior white house correspondent ed when i have current the president of that group -- ed henry is the currently the president of the group and said they're frustrated not having access to the president all weekend and they will continue to fight for transparency in the days ahead. okay. golf-gate. gutfeld, since you are back and here, you're up first. this isn't really necessarily about golf. this is about the press' frustration feeling like they are not getting access. now that president obama doesn't have another election to run for, maybe the white house press office is testing
in the protest as did a number of interfaith organizations. several smaller parallel rallies were held in cities across the country. more after headlines. if the obama administration has confirmed reports it's drafted a backup plan should congress fail to pass congress of the immigration reform. according to usada, the obama proposal would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain legal permanent residency status within eight years while containing massive spending on border militarization. president obama returned to his hometown of chicago on friday as part of a post-state of the union tour. he announced the visit in the aftermath of the killing a 15- year-old hadiya pendleton, a chicago teen shot days -- shot dead just days after performing at obama's second term inauguration. obama said the rate of killing people in chicago is equivalent to newtown massacre occurring every four months. >> something profound and uniquely heartbreaking and tragic, obviously, about a group of six-year olds being killed, but last year there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of tho
to a unique school here in new york city. it's aim is to teach a wide variety of kids of different abilities and backgrounds all in the same classroom. >>> we want to remind you about this friday's friday field trip. savannah, natalie, willie and i are going to miami. that's right. we're hitting the south beach, south beach wine and food festival and everything it entails. in fact, savannah, willie and matt will be my celebrity helpers at the barbecue thursday night. >> we're going to be your sous chefs because i can't cook. >> wondering why he couldn't have been invited to that show. >> miami show with the barbecue, can you really grill, al? >> oh, yeah. >> he grills good. >> i have two barbecue cookbooks. >> oh, that's right. >> come on. i'm ready to go. >> and you used to have a little weight on you. >> that's right. i used to wear that pregnancy empathy suit. >> a lot to get to with our celebrity co-host steve harvey. let's get to natalie morales with a check of the top headlines this morning. >>> good morning to you once again. life troubled by addiction and problems has ended in an app
" was started by 68 kids in oklahoma city. they had decided they had enough. they were not going to put up with this kind of thing happening anymore in their world without them doing everything they could to make it stop. i have met every single one of those 68 kids. do you know what they taught me? they come from all walks of life. there are red, yellow, black, and white. they all have one thing in common. they all treat each other with love and respect. do you know what that tells me? that tells me that this is a doable thing. it's doable. if those 68 kids from somebody different backgrounds can learn to love and respect each other, help each other out, humans can learn that. it is doable. we have to learn to respect ourselves, don't we? i am not going to stand up here and tell you you have to try to like everybody. not everybody is going to like you. all i'm trying to say is we all have the right just to be here. every single one of us has the right just to be who we are. laura and i, we have been to 605 schools in the past year and a half. we have gone as far as australia. we have talk
was located in philadelphia and other cities. he is also the only president who didn't represent a political party. >> technically i believe he is listed as an independent followed by adams who was a federalist. >> great tradition. second fun fact, thomas jefferson was the first president to be inaugurated in washington, d.c. where was george washington inaugurated. >> new york. >> grover cleveland is the only president to be elected to two non-consecutive terms. he was 22 and 24th president. >> who was the 23rd president? >> tell us, steve. >> steve: benjamin harrison who eventually died of the flu. now, this is one of the most fun. you think you know a lot about abraham lincoln. do you know he was a licensed bartender. he was the owner of berry and lincoln and saloon in springfield, illinois. >> barry liked the grape a little too much and he was an alcoholic. >> steve: is that true. i did not know that. >> "killing lincoln" turned into a movie appeared on national geographic last night. >> james madison, dolly's husband he was shortest of the presidents. he only was 5'4" and one other one
the inhabitants of this beloved city of rome. >> harris: pope benedict stepping down the end of the month, the first time it's happened in more than 600 years. the vatican says the conclave or vatican process could be moved up sooner. a showdown over the confirmation over senator chuck hagel shall the man president obama has picked to be the next secretary of defense. tonight one high ranking republican says a vote to confirm him should be allowed to happen. and the republicans successful solved his nomination, over a slew of concerns including the position over israel and iran and questions about how the white house has handled the terror attacks on our u.s. consulate in libya have also become part of the debate over chuck hagel. and steve scentanni is live with us. >> some republicans are questioning the qualifications of chuck hagel at the pentagon, but probably be confirmed anyway, now, hagel was widely criticized during his performance during the confirmation hearing and they delayed the vote so they'd have more time to ask the questions about the nominee, they say there should be be
's coming up this hour. >>> we'll also take you to a unique school here in new york city. it's aim is to teach a wide variety of kids of different abilities and backgrounds all in the same classroom. >>> we want to remind you about this friday's friday field trip. savannah, natalie, willie and i are going to miami. that's right. we're hitting the south beach, south beach wine and food festival and everything it entails. in fact, savannah, willie and matt will be my celebrity helpers at the barbecue thursday night. >> we're going to be your sous chefs because i can't cook. >> wondering why he couldn't have been invited to that show. >> miami show with the barbecue, can you really grill, al? >> oh, yeah. >> he grills good. >> i have two barbecue cookbooks. >> oh, that's right. >> come on. i'm ready to go. >> and you used to have a little weight on you. >> that's right. i used to wear that pregnancy empathy suit. >> a lot to get to with our celebrity co-host steve harvey. let's get to natalie morales with a check of the top headlines this morning. >>> good morning to you once again. l
americans. zain asher at a new york city gas station. drivers must be complaining this morning, zain. >> hi, soledad. drivers understandably upset. a gas station on tenth avenue. the average price of gasoline, 3.73 across the country. this particular gas station, gas prices are a lot higher, 4.15. as i mentioned, u.s. national average, 3.73. in hawaii, california, higher still, the most expensive place to buy gas right now. 4.28. california not far behind. the cheapest place to buy gas, in wyoming, 3.17. as you mentioned, americans right now spending a lot more money on heating bills, that, of course, means they don't have much money to spare in terms of gas prices, also, we've got taxes going up for a lot of americans. a lot of people seeing paychecks shrink. some taxi drivers, saying they are spending upward of 40, $50, $60 per day. it really is having a huge effect on people. >> what a big mess. thanks, zain appreciate that. >>> jennifer delgado in the weather center this morning with a freeze warning that could spell some serious trouble for florida citrus crops. good morning. >> hi, so
when i go to the store on fifth avenue here in new york city. not everybody lives in new york city. >> you have to buy directly from tiffany. you cannot trust as much anymore. honestly, who buys tiffany's at a cost go anyway? you go there to buy, you know, both purchases for your kitchen he. gerri: has not entirely true. they have breitling, a number of higher-end labels that i was shocked to see that they sold. it is even more confusing of a playing field i think for consumers because if you have bridling, if you have some of these high-in french jewelry retailer's, why wouldn't you have tiffany? it ihard to tell. >> i think the really intelligent consumers can tell, have done the homework. corporation you confining compare prices, compare, you know, looks. the end of the day the consumer is going to figure out into the negative publicity for costco and overtime it erodes the brand. it can really do harm to the company in you will see it. erri: sure they make these people whole, reimbursed and to some level? >> i think that costco should reimburse them antiphony shared by the cons
going on vacation, so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit to apply. by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. jenna: some new information on the white house immigration plan leaked over the weekend to "usa today." it would put illegals on a path to citizenship after beginning about eight years. it would require them to go to the back of the line behind legal applicants. the white house calls this a backup plan just in case congress doesn't come up with one of its own. but republicans like marco rubio blasted the plan calling it half-baked and seri
-per-hour reports. down into the 20s from new york city to cape cod it was a cold air mass behind us. windchills were brutal yesterday. they're still not fun this morning. everyone in new england is in the negative numbers. that's the white shading. minus 10 in albany. thankfully we don't have people out on the bus stops this morning. if you have to go out this morning you want the long johns and everything. the next storm is coming down. cold and windy up in north dakota and minnesota. as far as that storm, i want to show you this final image here. here is cape cod. this here is what almost looked like an eye of the storm. it was that power official a winter storm. it almost had the appearance of what we see for hurricane season. thank goodness no more of these coming. >> wow. you missed it, bill, i was trying to hand you a bottle of water there. i was off -- >> next time. >> next time. >>> coming up next on "first look," another chicago teen shooting tragedy. thousands march on the national mall and jfk history goes up for sale. >>> and being the leader of the free world does have its perks. y
's something that new york cops can do, that's some what happens in the city here. but, paul, can a deli do that? can they stop and frisk you? >> well, yes and no. if sthey suspect that you're a shop lifter, there's rules that they can detain you until police arrive on the scene. they thought he was a shop lifter, patting him down until the cops got there. it's pretty stupid by a low-end employee and i think the store is going to be embarrassed by that. >> one of the things we'll never know, we don't know, the state of mind of the employee here. how can you really ever prove when it was a honest mistake or some kind of racial profiling? paul? >> you know, done prove that. and forest whitaker would have to start a whole lawsuit. and he played idi amin. he's a tough guy. i think he can survive this incident. >> given the gentleman that he is, he didn't even want to call the authorities for fear of having that employee lose his job. what a guy, huh? but it happens every day. it sheds a big light on it and sh-t shouldn't happen. because of this, perhaps it will happen less. >> would it be worth
i'm driving back, and it's light at almost 6:00. it's light. look how beautiful new york city is. don't come to me, t.j. t.j. is obviously back, right? >> he must think you're beautiful too. >> i'm wearing a different sweater today. >> but the collar of the sweater looks like a mouse ate it. >> look how beautiful new york city is. where are we? we're in midtown looking north. >> yep, that's northwest. george washington bridge upper left. upper west side on the left part of the screen. that's the reservoir. >> the jacqueline kennedy r reservoir. >> yes, it is. i think they went with onassis. >> sill me me. do you know for the kid at home watching this on the history channel, she was, what, like 31, 32 when she became first lady? >> that's amazing. >> i think it was 31. >> i was 31 when i started "morning joe." >> no. >> you guys know that? >> no, actually. no, you weren't. in fact, you have a birthday coming up. >> no, i don't. i have no birthday coming up. >> yes, he does. all right. time to take a look at the morning papers. "the los angeles times," music fans are in mourning to
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that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide you with information. there's also a very powerful social component because we can show you interests you may have in common with peo
's helicopter flying over the city of chicago. she went to a corner store to get a pop and some chips and was caught in gang cross fire. a senior in high school. her family said she wanted to be a lawyer. wolf. >> is it on track now, the gang violence, the deaths, the senseless killings that are going on in chicago right now, potentially to be even worse this year than last? because last was awful. >> reporter: yeah, it was. and yes, the answer to your question, if things continue as they have already this year in the month of january, 42 murders, that's the most in the month of january since 2002. if it continues at this pace, unbelievably, chicago will have more murders this year than even last. >> ted rowlands, thanks very much. this important note to our viewers. i'm going to be speaking with jenay mcfarland's mother about her family's tragedy, later tonight, 8:00 p.m. eastern, i'm filling in for anderson cooper on "a.c. 360." >>> shock at the apparent suicide of country star mindy mccready. her life sounded like the lyrics of a heartbreak ballad, including drug abuse, domestic vi
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)